Albert Hall Redevelopment

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The redevelopment of one of Launceston's most significant heritage buildings will ensure that it becomes a contemporary, fit-for-purpose community asset that will continue to service the community for many years to come.

The proposal will modernise and greatly enhance the much loved qualities of Albert Hall by integrating it into the City Park - the way it was always intended to - and ensuring it is fit for purpose as a contemporary meeting and exhibition space.

The Federal Government has pledged $11 million for the project as a Launceston City Deal commitment, with the remaining $5 million funded through the Council's capital works budget.

The redevelopment will include a new reception area, foyer, cafe and function kitchen at ground floor level, and a new foyer and meeting room at the first floor level.

In December 2020, Council engaged with the community regarding the proposal, seeking feedback around current and future use of the Hall, and importantly what aspects of the historic building people cared most deeply about.

More than 1000 locals engaged with Council through that six week process, with more than 475 people completing the survey.

The Albert Hall (originally named 'The New Pavilion') was built in 1891 at a cost of 14,000 pounds to house the Tasmanian Industrial Exhibition of 1891-92.

When it was officially opened, the Hall was considered the 11th largest public building in the world.

In 1980, Council approved the original redesign of the eastern wing, new under-stage dressing rooms, acoustic improvements as well as access facilities and other general refurbishments.

The Council acknowledges that Northern Tasmanians are extremely passionate about the Albert Hall.

It is important that we help inform and reshape this project going forward in a genuine and meaningful way that both improves the usability of the hall while preserving its iconic facade and rich historic interior features.

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